Know How to Fold 'Em: How Origami Changed Science, From Heart Stents to Airbags

From LA Weekly

 

What do cutting-edge developments in heart stents, air bag logistics and space telescope lenses have in common with a folded paper frog? These advances in technological design all are based on the principles of origami -- an ancient sculptural art form with strong links to mathematics, engineering and science.

 

To read the full article, click here.

Bucky Balls could help you live a longer life

A new study by scientists at CHU de Médecine de Monastir, Université Paris Sud, and Université de Carthage have found that contrary to the long-believed theory that nanoparticles may be highly toxic, that bucky balls (buckminster fullerenes, or C60), may in fact increase or lifespan. When rats were fed a steady diet of buckyballs in olive oil, therats not only experienced no signs of chronic toxicity but doubled their lifespan. Read the full article on Science Direct.

Two Paid Getty Internships in Media Arts (this summer)

FREEWAVES is offering two paid internships for undergraduates this summer
through generous support from The Getty Grant Program.

FREEWAVES Multicultural Undergraduate Summer Internships 2012 are for 2 positions, Web Intern and Marketing Intern, both for 10-weeks, full-time, $3,500 gross salary in Hollywood.

In accordance with The Getty Grant Program, candidates must be:

Members of underrepresented groups, particularly individuals of African American, Asian, Latino/Hispanic, Native American, and Pacific Islander descent.
Currently enrolled as undergraduates, who will have completed at least one semester of college by June 2012, and will not graduate before September 2012.

Implanted Biofuel Cell Operating in a Living Snail

March 8, 2012.  Implantable biofuel cells have been suggested as sustainable micropower sources operating in living organisms, but such bioelectronic systems are still exotic and very challenging to design. Very few examples of abiotic and enzyme-based biofuel cells operating in animals in vivo have been reported. Implantation of biocatalytic electrodes and extraction of electrical power from small living creatures is even more difficult and has not been achieved to date.

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